Artistic Culinary Ware

About us:

           This is a creative collaboration of husband and wife partners Jody Salahub and David Stepan. With both of us bringing ideas, feedback, insight and energy, creating delightfully artistic pieces for you to enjoy personally and with friends. Shelley K. said "I have yet to see any items as beautiful as the copper items you create...and I have attended a number of art festivals this winter." We always try to make things so beautiful they transcend their purpose. That is what we are about.
           We continue to make real efforts to be "green", using salvaged copper, reclaimed materials like the urban felled trees that provide the growth rings for some of our boards, and soapstone from Quebec (instead of from South America) though it may cost us more. Always the artfulness of the end result is of the greatest importance, and I would say we are religious about that.
           We also love the delight that simply beautiful things can bring...Jody's refinement of the packaging (Beverly P. said "just received your beautiful culinary knives, etc. I love the presentation of each, in a case with copper detail. "). Her keen artistic eye, intuition, insights, and abilities create a long list of upcoming products and improvements.
           David has always been interested in the decorative surfaces of materials. From the extraordinary grains, and peculiar characteristics of the woods he's worked with, to the way hammered metal can actually feel soft and pleasurable to touch, and the delightful exclamation point of a crystal or stone. Being able to explore and express the passion for this has led to these current lines.

          Traditionally when resolving a split in a piece of lumber, the offending crack would be fixed in place by insetting a butterfly (a double dovetail that holds both sides of the crack in stasis). By employing angled solid pieces of copper or stone, the principle of the butterfly is maintained, the wood is stitched together, with the pleasing result of a pattern of juxtaposed materials. That this board can then be used to serve someone’s fare, inspiring conversation is wonderful. When these pieces are exhibited it is fun to watch people come up to touch the keys filled with curiosity and wonder.

          In David's work there has always been an exploration of the idea of surface decoration, usually employing interesting woodgrains, investigating it further with solid parquet blocks, and now using growth ring elements. He always enjoyed looking at growth rings, and trunk sections, visually, and the implications and considerations of time as captured in the growth rings. Beyond the striking visual element, he believes it is the aspect of time represented in the growth rings that makes this so appealing. He first introduced the growth ring idea into his furniture as a decorative feature in the headboard of a large platform bed. Subsequently in a vanity included in a 'live' edge format, where the organic shape of the trunk sections floating like jellyfish flush in the bed of parquet was an interesting contrast. The surreal sense of these boards reminds him of the floating clocks of Salvador Dali. The boards often receive the the question “How did you do that?”; it is a tedious and complicated process, as I’m asking the wood to perform in ways it really shouldn’t, effectively breaking some rules.

           The copper work is very expressive, each hammer blow quite directly affects the piece, as if the hammer blow was a paint stroke. Sometimes many are required to wrought the final result, but it is the final few that make the piece. Being expressive encourages the opportunity for more whimsical pieces.

           We are restlessly creative.